Research: Deltas - Under Review



Team


Project 4

Title: The impact of Decision-making on Conflict: Rethinking the roles of Technocrats and Residents during Tidal River Management in coastal Bangladesh

Journal Article: Under review

Abstract: Tidal river management (TRM) is a building-with-nature practise which was locally developed to tackle the problems of polderization in the south-western delta of Bangladesh. This practise was subsequently adapted by public agencies. However, all TRM sites are associated with violent conflict. While law-enforcement agencies have often struggled to bring such conflict under control, there is variation in the extent to which conflict associated with TRM has been mitigated at different study-sites. However, different decision-making approaches have characterized different implementations of TRM. Different implementations of TRM are also characterized by differences in the role of civil society organizations (CSOs). Therefore this article hypothesizes that variation in conflict mitigation is associated with variation in decision-making approaches and role of CSOs. Accordingly the research question that this article seeks to answer is: How can conflict be mitigated for the effective planning and implementation of TRM? This question is answered by analysing 5 case-studies on TRM using a typology of three different decision-making approaches: technocratic, participatory and sociocratic. Using data collected via 2 focus-group discussions, 66 semi-structured interviews and secondary research, this article analyses issues associated with power differentials, dysfunctional consensus, differences between local & scientific knowledge and the role of CSOs in mitigating conflict. This research reveals that conflict during TRM implementation can be successfully mitigated by the development of conflict resolution mechanisms which are locally-respected and are also considered trust-worthy by the elite. The elite will become more receptive to engaging with the public if TRM implementation is characterized by sociocratic decision-making.

Team


Jahin Shams

Website: https://bd.linkedin.com/in/jahin-shams-sakkhar-0335b4148

Dr. Frank van Laerhoven

Website: https://www.uu.nl/staff/default.aspx?lng=NL&Profielpagina=FSJvanLaerhove...

Dr. Peter Driessen

Website: https://www.uu.nl/staff/ppjdriessen

Dr. Sanchayan Nath

Website: https://www.sanchayannath.com


Project 4

Title:Mental Models and Institutional Misfit: Governance of Human-environmental systems in the Ganges Delta

Journal Article: Under review

Abstract: Sustainable governance of complex socio-hydrological systems requires that rules ‘fit’ their social and biophysical characteristics. For ensuring fit, stakeholders need to understand the intricacies of the system. The effectiveness of governance or management practices associated with a particular system depends on how well stakeholders internalize the intricacies of such a system. This is because mental models influence decision-making and determine human action. However, theoretical clarity is required on the various factors which affect stakeholder mental models, how such mental models are associated with system outcomes and whether this leads to institutional fit. Therefore, the research questions that this article seeks to answer are: What factors influence stakeholder mental models in socio-hydrological systems? How are such mental models associated with performance outcomes in associated socio- hydrological systems? These questions are answered by analyzing by data collected from a sample of polders (some of which are characterized by tidal river management) in the Ganges delta of Bangladesh. Data was then collected using site visits, face-to- face interviews, telephone interviews and secondary research on variables derived from this framework. Respondents were sampled geographically by customizing the transect method popularly used in the ecological sciences. Data was then analyzed using matrix algebra, graph theory, GIS analysis and regression analysis. Resident characteristics demonstrate statistically significant associations with mental model similarity, after controlling for contextual political variables and feedback from system performance. Mental model similarity also demonstrates statistically significant association with perceptions about performance, after controlling for contextual political variables and contextual biophysical variables. In other words, mental models based on incomplete understanding or erroneous assumptions about socio-hydrological systems may influence system performance leading to Institutional misfit. This conclusion was derived by first proposing a new theoretical framework for analyzing the association between mental models and institutional fit and then using innovative inter-disciplinary research methodology for testing the framework..

Team


Jahin Shams

Website: https://bd.linkedin.com/in/jahin-shams-sakkhar-0335b4148

Dr. Frank van Laerhoven

Website: https://www.uu.nl/staff/default.aspx?lng=NL&Profielpagina=FSJvanLaerhove...

Dr. Sanchayan Nath

Website: https://www.sanchayannath.com

Copyright © 2012 Sanchayan Nath.
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